Questions for The Bones Lady?

Kathy ReichsKathy Reichs is a forensic anthropologist, award winning crime writer and producer of the hit Fox TV series Bones, which is based on her work and her novels.

Her first Temperance Brennan novel, Déjà Dead, won the 1997 Ellis Award for Best First Novel and became a bestseller. The sixteenth novel in the series, Bones of the Lost, was released last month. That’s one Tempe novel released every year for the last 16 years.

To my mind, writing one book per year counts as an outstanding achievement in itself. It is nothing short of astonishing to know that at the same time, Dr Reichs has continued working as a forensic anthropologist, dividing her time Laboratoire des Sciences Judiciaires et de Médecine Légale for the province of Quebec and her professorship at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

As if that wasn’t enough, Kathy has also written four novels in the Virals series for young adults, following the adventures of Temperance Brennan’s niece, Tory.

In honour of Kathy Reichs’ upcoming visit to Melbourne next week, I am running a competition on this blog to see who can come up with the best question for ‘The Bones Lady’.

Leave your suggestions as comments and I will choose the best to put to Kathy Reichs when I interview her at one or both of the following events:

Sisters in Crime & the Athenaeum Library present:
Bone up on wonderful crime writing
Tues 17 Sept 2013, 6.30PM
US forensic anthropologist and crime writer Kathy Reichs spills the secrets of her international literary success to Angela Savage
Comedy Club, 2nd floor, 188 Collins St, Melbourne
Information and tickets here.

City of Melbourne – Melbourne Library Service presents:
Kathy Reichs in conversation with Angela Savage
Wed 18 Sept 2013, 12.15-1.30PM
Join Angela Savage in conversation with international-bestselling author, Kathy Reichs, as she gets under the skin of forensics with this inspirational crime writer, professor, leading forensic anthropologist & creator of the smash-hit TV series, BONES.
Swanston Hall, Lower Melbourne Town Hall, 100 Swanston St, Melbourne
Free event but bookings recommended; see here for details.

I will endeavour to note Kathy’s response to the winning question(s) and report back. Judge’s decision is highly subjective and no further correspondence will be entered into — you know the drill.

Your questions please…

 

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About Angela Savage

Angela Savage is a Melbourne-based crime writer, who has lived and travelled extensively in Asia. Her first novel, Behind the Night Bazaar won the 2004 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript. She is a winner of the Scarlet Stiletto Award and has thrice been shortlisted for Ned Kelly awards. Her third novel, The Dying Beach, was also shortlisted for the 2014 Davitt Award. Angela teaches writing and is currently studying for her PhD in Creative Writing at Monash University.
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4 Responses to Questions for The Bones Lady?

  1. Ellie Marney says:

    Well, Angela, I’d love to know how she writes a book a year!! (actually more than that, counting the Virals series, my god…) As far as forensic questions go, I’ve wondered how long does a body have to be dead for it to qualify as a forensic anthropology case instead of a regular homicide? (not a particularly scintillating question, but it’s the only one I can think of at the mo!) Again, SO wishing I could be there…please make sure you give us a full report! xx Ellie

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  2. kathy d. says:

    A somewhat trite question for Kathy Reichs but Where does she get ideas for themes for her books? Do any of them come from real forensic cases she’s investigated? And, how has the development of high technology in forensics changed the writing about mysterious deaths?

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    • Hi Kathy D, I know for a fact that Kathy R bases her stories on her real life case work and I plan to talk with her about some of the specifics. I like your question about how technological developments have changed writing about mystery deaths — indeed, even our concept of mystery. Thanks for that suggestion.

      Like

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